December 30, 2010

USA, 1899: PGMs and other Metal Prices; Bausch & Lomb Catalogue

Possibly, a Ten-Year Average Price.

1899: 1 Troy Ounce platina (SPb Spot: 83% Ore, Avg?) = USD$ 11.

February, 1899:

 
1899: 1 Troy Ounce Platinum (SPb Spot: Refined) = USD$ 15.22
1899: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (German Mkt) = USD$ 15.19

Citation: Engineering and Mining Journal, Vol. 112, #12 ; American Institute of Mining Engineers (1921), p.478


1899: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (Semi-Mfg, Ret.) = USD$ 22.

1899:
Citation: Annual reports of the officers of the State of Indiana (1900) p.234



In 1899, the refined wholesale price surged 25%. US wholesale was was >25% higher than ore, and the retail price was yet again >30% higher than wholesale.

The retail premium for Pt was at least ~65% over the market price. 
 

1899: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (semi-refined, whols.) = USD$ 16.
1899: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (semi-mfg, whols.) = USD$ 20.

1899: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (ore, intrinsic, mkt) = USD$ 14.50 - 16.
1899: 1 Troy Oz. Palladium (semi-mfg, mkt) = USD$ 52.87
1898: 1 Troy Oz. Iridium (refined, German mkt) = USD$ 37.
1899: 1 Troy Oz. Osmium (ore?, mkt) = USD$ 29.55
1899: 1 Troy Oz. Rhodium (refined, mkt) = USD$ 89.29
1899: 1 Troy Oz. Ruthenium (refined, mkt) = USD$ 48.21


1899: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (B&L Catalogue) = USD$ 26.50 ?
1899: 1 Troy Oz. Palladium (B&L Catalogue) = USD$46.65
1899: 1 Troy Oz. Iridium (B&L Catalogue) = USD$ 31.10
1899: 1 Troy Oz. Osmium (B&L Catalogue) = USD$ 62.20
1899: 1 Troy Oz. Rhodium (B&L Catalogue) = USD$ 466.50
1899: 1 Troy Oz. Ruthenium (B&L Catalogue) = USD$ 155.50

1899: 1 Troy Oz. Silver (B&L Catalogue) = USD$ 1.62


December 1898: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (NY Spot: Ore 83%?) = USD$ 15.50
December 1898: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (SF Spot: .999) = USD$ 16.00
December 1898: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (London Spot: .999) ~ USD$ 14.56 (£ 3.0)

circa December 31, 1898:


c.Feb./Mar. 1899:
Feb? 1899: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (NYC Spot, Refined) = USD$ 17.00




Where 1 Square Inch of Platinum Foil Cost USD$ 0.93, at the standard 0.75 Gram/Sq.In. rate,  

January 1899: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (Foil, retail) = USD$ 31.10

Citation: The Pharmaceutical Era, Vol. 21 (1899) p.190
 
May, 1899
 
June 22, 1899:

June 1899: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (NY Spot: Ore 83?) = USD$ 16.25
June 1899: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (SF Spot: .999) = USD$ 16.75
June 1899: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (London Spot: .999) ~ USD$ 15.32 (£ 3.1563)


Sept. 1899: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (Trade) = USD$ 20.  

Citation: Interstate druggist (Sept 1899) Vol. 1, Issue 1 p.59


November 1899: Scrap, $15.50/oz

1899: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (Trade) = USD$ 16. 

Citation: Prospecting, locating and valuing mines: a practical treatise for the use... ; Richard Henry Stretch (1903) pp. 331+




 
Citation: Chemicals and reagents Bausch & Lomb Optical Company(1899)













Silver Foil: 25 Grams


1899: Central Electric Catalogue


Photography: Warren quoted prices for platinum paper in 1899: one dozen sheets of 4 x 5 platinum paper cost 45 cents.


Late December, 1899: 1 Troy Ounce platina (SF: Ore, Spot) = USD$ 6.00 -12.00

Citation: Mining and Scientific Press, Vol. 79-80 1/6/1900 p.17


December 26, 2010

USA, 1917: Platinum Ware

c. October 1917: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (semi-mfg, black-market) = USD$ 200.


Citation: Revenue Act of 1918; Part 3, United States Congress: House Committee on Ways and Means, Claude Kitchin p.1350


Late? 1917: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (semi-mfg, whols.) = USD$ 120.
Late? 1917: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (Scrap BOUGHT) = USD$ 90.

In April 1917 the market price for Platinum ingot was $103.77. The 'net price' is understood to be either the market price for the refined metal (excluding any manufacturing cost) OR the manufacturer's wholesale market price (excluding any taxes or duties.)

If the former case, the retail price for semi-manufactured Platinum should be incrementally/ proportionately higher.

April 1917: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (manufactured, whols.) = USD$ 115.69
April 1917: 1 Troy Oz. Palladium Gold Alloy (, whols.) = USD$ 62.20

Palladium Prices, monthly (1917): $73. - 130.60

Citation: The Mineral Industry, Vol. 27 p.571





(?) 1916: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (Mfg, Trade) = USD$ 115.69
(?) 1916: 1 Troy Oz. Palladium Gold Alloy (Trade) = USD$ 62.20


Citation: Soil science, Vol. 3, Rutgers University (1917) p.xix


Citation: The Journal of the National Dental Association, Vol. 5 (1917) p.1145


Platinised Gold, prior to 1918:
 


 Imports of PGMs:






History of events in US Pt mkt:









December 24, 2010

1901/2: Another Eimer & Amend Catalogue

Unmanufactured generally or manufactures for educational institutions were duty-free; otherwise, +20% ad valorem for dishes, crucuibles, etc.
 
1902: 1 Troy Ounce Platinum (scrap, whols.) = USD$ 21.77
1902: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (semi-mfg, foil, whols.) = USD$ 24.88
1902: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (mfg, whols.) = USD$ 25.50 - 35.66


Citation: Illustrated wholesale catalogue with prices current of chemical & physical ... (1902) Eimer & Amend pp.






December 22, 2010

UK, 1841: Smee's Battery (w/ Palmer's Catalogue)

1840/1: 1 Troy Ounce Platinum (London: Semi-Mfg, Ret.)  = £ 1.50 (USD$  7.17)

1841: 1 Ozt. Platinum (Glasgow: Semi-Mfg, Ret.)  = £ 2.-2.25 (USD$ 9.56.-10.75)
1841: 1 Ozt. Platinum (Glasgow: Mfg, Ret.)  = £ 2.50? (USD$ 11.95)

Glasgow retail prices for London manufactures were generally 25% higher. In Griffin's Glasgow Catalogue, Daniel's Constant Galvanic Battery (Item #325) appears 88% more expensive than Palmer's (Fig. 160, p.40); no Grove's Batteries were offered

A standard crucible then used by an operative chemist was 0.408625 Ozt.  

The 1/2 Imperial Fl. Oz Crucible had a Cover that was ~47% of the total price.

By assumption, Platinum Foil (0.5 x 4.0 In.) cost £0.0667;  dubious but if 1.725 Grams, 

1840/1: 1 Troy Ounce Platinum (London: Semi-Mfg, Ret.)  = £ 1.20
 

Catalogue published in 1841; addendum to 1844 book

Citation: Elements of Agricultural Chemistry; Sir Humphry Davy, John Shier (1844)



 









#457 "Contents. 1 Ounce" corresponds exactly to Griffin's Evaporating Basin of 360 Grains (0.75 Ozt.; 23.33 Gr.) @ £ 1.50/Ozt., too low to be correct; in London 35 years later, Griffin sold Platinumware £ 2.50/Ozt. Manufactures were not cheaper than thick Plate Wire or wire, already @ >£ 2.00/Ozt.

#462 "Contents. 7 Ounce" corresponds to an Evaporating Basin of 66 Grams (2.122 Ozt.)  200 cc 67 Gram, so @ £ 1.90/Ozt.



Weights:




Spongy Platinum Wick



1841: 1 Ozt. Platinum (Glasgow: Semi-Mfg, Ret.)  = £ 2. - 2.25





1843: Glasgow trade prices were 50% lower than London, for Scottish goods; ~100% higher for London manufactures,




In 1840, the UK catalogue price for a small single Grove Battery (of a 6-Set) was £ 0.2917 (USD$ 1.46) ; the larger Battery cost £ 0.4167 (USD$ 2.08). 

In 1848, the New York catalogue price for a small Grove Battery was USD$ 1.13 ; the medium cost $1.38 and the larger size cost USD$ 1.63.

1840/1: 1 Ozt, Platinum (Refined, Retail)  = £ 1.50 (USD$  7.17)

1839/40:
Citation: Elements of electro-metallurgy, or, The art of working in metals ... Alfred Smee (1841) pp.











At the rate cited by Smee in 1839, £ 1.00 of Platinum would electroplate 1,280 sq. in. ; and £ 0.01 would electroplate 12.8 sq. in.

Citation: Philosophical magazine (1840), p.316



1839: Grove's first Battery had a 6" x .07143" (1/14th not 1/56th) piece of Platinum wire (est. weight:     troy ounce); the battery components (excl. Platinum) cost an estimated £

1840: 1 Troy Ounce Platinum (Semi-Mfg, Retail)  = ~£ 2. (USD$  9.??)

Citation: The Literary gazette: A weekly journal of literature, science ..., Vol. 23 By Henry Christmas (1840), p.552

December, 1841:

1840: 1 Ozt. Platinized Silver Foil (semi-mfg, retail)  = £ 0.50
1840: 1 Ozt.  Silver Foil (semi-mfg, retail)  = £ 0.45

Citation: The Penny Mechanic and Chemist: A Magazine of the Arts and Sciences (December 1841) p.440






In 1841, Rhodium pens had long been sold for £ 0.50; the 1825 price was £ 0.75.  Sometime between 1825-41, the price fell by one-third.

1841:



1848 (USA):


c.1841: Curious early report of Russian withdrawal of Platinum Coinage

Citation: Elements of Chemistry: Including the Most Recent Discoveries ...Robert Kane (1842) p.668


Platinum in Solution,