June 1, 2012

UK, 1859

In 1859, the English refiner's transport, duty, and trade cost from Colombia was ~28.69%.
The wholesale market price was ~50% than the intrinsic price of platina, at market.

Refiners undoubtedably reaped greater savings with discounted bulk purchases or contract prices far lower than 'common prices.'  In 1859, Platinum still sold at the same 1850 wholesale price, strongly suggesting source- and spot-price stability.

March, 1859: 
1859: 1 Troy Ounce platina (Cartagena: 84% ore) = £ 0.8653
1859: 1 Troy Oz platina (Colombian Spot, .999) ~ £1.03

1859: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (UK mkt: refined) = £ 1.25 (USD$ 6.13)

1859: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (UK mkt: wholesale) = £ 1.50 (USD$ 7.35)

April 1860: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (refined, retail) = £ 1.60 (USD$ 7.11)  
1859/60: 1 Troy Oz. Platinum (intrinsic) = £ 1.35 (USD$ 6.62)
1859/60: 1 Troy Oz. Gold (intrinsic) = £ 3.66 (USD$ 17.92)

  
January, 1859:

Citation : The Photographic News; ed. W. Crookes. Vol. 1/7/1859 p.214
 


1859/60: retail price

Citation : The Chemical news, Vols. 1-2 (1860) p.216

a 2"x6" (12 sq. in, 24 sq. in of surface) sheet Platinum cost ~£ 0.35 (~0.22 Ozt) 47% of the Grove-Styled 20-Cell described by Wylde.  Each Cell would presumably hold .6 sq. in. (1.2 sq. in. surface) Platinum, about 5.3 Grains Troy per Cell.

Very Thin Sheets:  ~£ 0.029167 per sq. in. Pt and 54.86 Sq In. Pt (109.71 Sq. In.) per Ozt.  

Citation: The magic of science, a manual of easy scientific experiments; James Wylde (1859)
 

The counterfeit US Eagles of the 1850s were mention  in 1918.

Citation : Mechanics Magazine ; John I Knight, Henry Lacey (1860) p.363

1859: 1 Troy Oz. Chlor-platinate (salt, unknown purity) = £ 1.20 (USD$ 5.88)

Citation: The Photographic Journal, Vol. 5 1859

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